Posts for: October, 2014

By Edward Joseph, D.D.S.
October 23, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   nutrition  
WorkWithYourChildsSchooltoEncourageHealthySnackFoods

There’s a new focus on children’s nutrition by both parents and schools; in fact, many school districts have instituted policies that encourage children to eat more nutritional foods and snacks. Regarding snacks in particular, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently released new regulations for the Smart Snacks in Schools Initiative that call for more whole grains, fruits and vegetables and less fat, sugar and salt in snack foods.

These regulations will help fight obesity and related medical problems like diabetes, but many dentists don’t believe they go far enough in one particular area — the consumption of sugar, a major cause of tooth decay. Dentists also feel the guidelines are too generous in the amount allowed for highly acidic beverages like sodas, ice tea, sports drinks and energy drinks that increase the risk of enamel erosion and tooth decay.

You may also be concerned about how much sugar your child is eating, and for the most part you’re able to manage their intake when they’re at home. But what can you do to influence their snack choices and habits when they’re at school?

For one thing, get involved with your child’s school and with other parents. Let school officials know your concerns about the sugar, fat and salt content of the snacks offered in the school’s vending machines and food service, and work to implement policies that discourage less nutritional snack foods. You should also set limits for your children about what snacks they can buy at school — along with explaining why they should avoid certain kinds of snack foods in favor of others. And, be sure to send healthy snacks along with them when they go to school that are bite-sized and fun.

It’s also important to help your children limit how often they snack and avoid “grazing” — nibbling on snack food for hours on end. Grazing can cause the mouth to be continuously acidic and never allow saliva an opportunity to neutralize the acid. You can also suggest similar policies to school officials, such as shutting down vending machines at certain times of the day.

Nutrition is essential to good health, in the mouth as well as the rest of the body. As a parent, it’s your job to see that your children eat nutritiously — enlisting their schoolâ??s help will make that job a little easier.

If you would like more information on dental-friendly snacking, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Snacking at School.”


ProfessionalCleaningsHelpyouMaintainHealthyTeethandGums

Every good oral hygiene regimen has two parts — the part you do (brushing and flossing) and the part we do (professional cleanings and checkups).

But what’s involved with “professional cleanings” — and why do we perform it? The “why” is pretty straightforward — we’re removing plaque and calculus. Plaque is a thin film of bacteria and food remnant that adheres to tooth surfaces and is the main culprit in dental disease. Calculus (tartar) is calcified plaque that occurs over time as the minerals in saliva are deposited in bacterial plaque. It isn’t possible for you to remove calculus regardless of your efforts or hygiene efficiency. Ample research has shown that calculus forms even in germ-free animals during research studies, so regular cleanings are a must to keep you healthy.

The “what” depends on your mouth’s state of health and your particular needs. The following are some techniques we may use to clean your teeth and help you achieve and maintain healthy teeth and gums.

Scaling. This is a general term for techniques to manually remove plaque and calculus from tooth surfaces. Scaling typically encompasses two approaches: instruments specially designed to remove plaque and calculus by hand; or ultrasonic equipment that uses vibration to loosen and remove plaque and calculus, followed by flushing with water and/or medicaments. Scaling can be used for coronal maintenance (the visible surfaces above the gum line) or periodontal (below the gum line).

Root planing. Similar to scaling, this is a more in-depth technique for patients with periodontal disease to remove plaque and calculus far below the gum line. It literally means to “plane” away built up layers of plaque and calculus from the root surfaces. This technique may employ hand instruments, or an ultrasonic application and flushing followed by hand instruments to remove any remaining plaque and calculus.

Polishing. This is an additional procedure performed on the teeth of patients who exhibit good oral health, and what you most associate with that “squeaky clean” feeling afterward. It’s often performed after scaling to help smooth the surface of the teeth, using a rubber polishing cup that holds a polishing paste and is applied with a motorized device. Polishing, though, isn’t merely a cosmetic technique, but also a preventative measure to remove plaque and staining from teeth — a part of an overall approach known as “prophylaxis,” originating from the Greek “to guard or prevent beforehand.”

If you would like more information on teeth cleaning and plaque removal, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teeth Polishing.”


By Edward Joseph, D.D.S.
October 07, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
FindingtheRightBacterialBalanceforOptimumOralHealth

By the time you reach adulthood, roughly 100 trillion microscopic organisms will have taken up residence in and on your body, outnumbering your own cells 10 to 1. Most are bacteria, a domain of the animal kingdom considered synonymous with disease. But only a few of the thousands of bacterial species cause us harm; the rest are either benign or actually beneficial to our health, including in our mouths.

Dentistry pioneered much of our knowledge about bacteria, developing processes used to identify, classify and understand those species inhabiting our mouths. Science as a whole is catching up with the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) begun in 2007. Through HMP, researchers have catalogued and begun to study more than 10,000 bacterial species.

We’re finding that our bodies develop a symbiotic relationship with many of these creatures invisible to the naked eye. During our infancy the bacteria we ingest from birth and breast feeding begin to interact with our body’s immune system, “teaching” it to refrain from attacking friendly organisms that contribute to health and searching and destroying enemy species that cause disease.

We’re also learning that an imbalance with our individual population of bacteria has links with disease. Our digestive system is a prime example: bacteria related to obesity can overpopulate our digestive tract, while malnutrition can create an environment that produces too many bacteria that inhibit digestion of vitamins and other nutrients.

The same microbial imbalance can occur in the mouth. For example, our typical Western diet encourages the growth of bacteria most associated with tooth decay (Streptococcus mutans). We’re also finding that tobacco smoking creates a mouth environment more conducive to the bacteria that cause gum disease. Just by quitting smoking you can alter that environment to encourage growth of health-promoting bacteria and inhibit growth of malevolent species.

The desired outcome of this knowledge is to develop treatments that target disease-causing bacteria without harming those beneficial to us (as often occurs with traditional antibiotics). In dentistry, such possibilities could help stop the spread of tooth decay, gum disease or similar bacterial infections, while fostering a healthier oral environment that prevents disease and protects health.

If you would like more information on healthy aspects of bacteria, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.




Burbank, CA Dentist
Edward C. Joseph, D.D.S.
2701 West Alameda Ave, Suite #503
Burbank, CA 91505
(818) 842-7628

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