Posts for: August, 2014

DentalHygienist-YourPartnerinPreventingDiseaseandMaintainingOralHealth

Keeping up your dental hygiene with daily brushing and flossing is essential to preventing disease and maintaining good oral health. But that doesn’t mean it’s all on your shoulders — the fact is, you have a strong partner in your dental hygienist. This valuable member of our staff provides a number of different functions that add a boost to your hygiene habits.

Perhaps the most important of those functions is semi-annual teeth cleanings. While daily brushing and flossing removes most of the bacterial plaque that causes dental disease and decay, harder deposits (tartar) will still form over time, especially in places your brush or floss can’t reach. To remove it requires advanced skills and specially designed hand instruments or ultrasonic equipment. In the case of advancing gum disease, your hygienist may also assist with a procedure known as root planing to reach plaque and tartar adhering to tooth root surfaces below the gum line.

Dental hygienists are also on the lookout for abnormalities that may be a sign of disease. During teeth-cleaning sessions, your hygienist looks for gum inflammation or bleeding that may indicate the presence of periodontal gum disease, a progressive condition that, left untreated, could lead to tooth loss. We will be able to assess the extent of the disease by gently probing and measuring any detachment of the gum tissue that has formed voids known as pockets. They also look for signs of oral cancer — bumps, sores or areas of swelling or tenderness.

There’s one other function your hygienist provides to enhance your oral health — educating and training you on dental care. They can provide you helpful information on risk factors for tooth decay or other dental diseases, along with helpful ways to reduce that risk. They can also help you improve your brushing and flossing techniques by demonstrating proper form.

Cleaning, monitoring and educating — these different “hats” your hygienist wears form a beneficial part of your overall dental care. Working together, you’ll be able to keep your teeth and gums in good form and function.

If you would like more information on the benefits of a dental hygienist, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Hygiene Visit.”


By Edward Joseph, D.D.S.
August 20, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
MajorBenefitsforToothReplacementWithDentalImplants

Perhaps you’ve heard a lot about dental implants, an increasingly popular tooth replacement system. Although they can be expensive (depending on the exact application) they have a number of important benefits that add value to your investment.

Here are four of those benefits that make dental implants one of the best tooth replacement options available:

Life-like Appearance. Like an automobile, an implant’s “engine” — the titanium post inserted into the jawbone — is covered by a stylish “body” — the visible crown, custom-made to look just like the natural tooth. Composed of porcelain ceramic or a similar translucent material, the implant crown is the key to not only restoring natural function in the mouth but also rejuvenating your smile.

Long-term Durability. Implants have been in use for over three decades (over 3 million placed since their introduction) and have built an impressive track record for durability. If properly cared for, it’s possible for dental implants to last for many years or even a lifetime. Compared with other restorations that may not last as long and lead to additional dental cost, the implant’s “return on investment” can be quite high.

Contribution to Bone Health. Most implants are made of surgical titanium, which has a strong affinity with bone. In time, bone cells will grow and fuse with the titanium. The result is not only a solid anchoring of the implant into the jaw, but also the preservation and possible re-growth of bone mass where it may have been lost.

Versatility. Although implants are often used as a single tooth replacement, they’re increasingly used in multiple-tooth replacements. A few strategically placed implants can permanently support a bridge (two or more teeth linked together), an arch (an entire set of upper or lower teeth), or as a foundational support for a removable denture, particularly the lower arch.

If you’ve experienced tooth loss, a preliminary dental examination will determine if you’re a potential candidate for dental implant replacement. If so, dental implants could be a way for you to not only restore lost function but also regain your smile.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants 101.”


ReplaceMissingTeethtoPreventOtherTeethFromMovingOutofPlace

Although your teeth feel as if they’re rigidly set in the jawbone, they’re actually capable of movement. In fact, dynamic tooth movement is an essential mechanism in good dental function — it allows your teeth to adapt to changes brought on by age and other factors.

The periodontal ligament is a key component in this mechanism. This elastic tissue actually holds the teeth to the bone through tiny fibers that attach to the tooth root on one side of the ligament and to the jawbone on the other. The teeth move within the ligament to maintain contact with both adjacent and opposing teeth in response to changes like the normal wear that occurs due to aging.

This is a primary reason why a missing tooth should be replaced by an artificial one as soon as possible. Because of the tendency just described, teeth next to the space left by the missing tooth will begin to move (or drift) into the space at an accelerated rate. The end result is teeth out of their normal position and range, which could seriously disrupt their normal function as well as adversely affect your appearance.

This is especially important for back teeth. Because they’re not easily visible to others when we open our mouths, many people will forgo replacement when they’re lost. But missing back teeth can set off a chain reaction of movement that could eventually hinder jaw function.

The best option for a tooth replacement is a dental implant. Life-like and durable, dental implants encourage bone growth at the implant site and adjacent teeth will respond to it as they would a natural tooth. If an implant isn’t feasible, then a fixed bridge is also a viable replacement option that will prevent drift. As a result, tooth movement should continue normally with no adverse effects on function.

If you’ve lost teeth or are about to undergo tooth extraction, it’s in your other teeth’s best interest to consider a permanent replacement. A new implant or bridge will vastly improve your smile and prevent more serious problems in the future.

If you would like more information on the importance of teeth replacement, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Replacing Back Teeth.”


TakingPrecautionsBeforeDuringandAfterImplantsWillHelpEnsureSuccess

One of the many reasons for dental implant popularity is their reliability — studies have shown 95% of implants still function well after ten years. Still, on rare occasions an implant will fail. We can minimize this risk by taking precautions before, during and after installation.

Long-term success begins with careful planning before surgery. We thoroughly examine your teeth and jaws, using x-rays or CT scanning to map out the exact location of nerves, sinus cavities and other anatomical structures. Along with your medical history, this data will help us develop a precise guide to use during implant surgery.

We’ll also assess bone quality at the intended implant site. The implant needs an adequate amount of bone for support — without it the implant will not be able to withstand the biting force of normal chewing. It may be possible in some cases to use bone grafting or similar techniques to stimulate growth at the site, but sometimes other restoration options may need to be considered.

The surgery can also impact future reliability. By precisely following the surgical guide developed during the planning stage, the oral surgeon can increase the chances of success. Still, there may be an unseen variable in play — a pre-existing or post-operative infection, for example, that interferes with the integration of the implant with the bone. By carefully monitoring the healing process, we can detect if this has taken place; if so, the implant is removed, the area cleansed and the implant (or a wider implant) re-installed.

Even if all goes well with the implantation, there’s still a chance of future failure due to gum disease. Caused mainly by bacterial plaque, gum disease infects and inflames the supporting tissues around the teeth; in the case of implants it could eventually infect and weaken the surrounding bone, a condition known as peri-implantitis. This calls for aggressive treatment, including plaque and infected tissue removal, and possible surgery to repair the bone’s attachment to the implant. Without treatment, the implant could eventually detach from the weakened bone.

Maintaining your implants with good oral hygiene and regular dental checkups is the best insurance for long-term reliability. Taking care of them as you would natural teeth will help ensure a long, happy life for your “third set” of teeth.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants.”


ConsciousSedationcanMakeYourChildsDentalVisitMorePleasant

Anxiety in a child during dental procedures could interfere with the care they need. But recent advances in sedation drug therapy can calm pediatric patients safely and allow us to perform more invasive procedures without general anesthesia.

In contrast to general anesthesia, conscious sedation allows a patient to relax and feel calm while still breathing normally on their own and able to respond to certain stimuli. Conscious sedation can be deep, moderate or minimal. Deep sedation is akin to sleep and will also cause the child not to remember details of the procedure when they awaken. At the other end of the spectrum is minimal sedation, the most common type used in pediatric dentistry, which allows patients to respond to touching or verbal commands. Deep sedation drugs are usually administered intravenously, while those used for minimal sedation are administered orally with syrup. Conscious sedation doesn’t prevent pain, so it must also be accompanied by local anesthesia or other pain-relieving methods.

After you arrive for your child’s procedure, we’ll normally conduct a pre-sedation evaluation to be sure there are no medical problems that might interfere with the sedation. We typically use Midazolam (under the brand name Versed) or Hydroxyzine (also known as Vistaril or Atarax) to achieve sedation. Both are very safe, fast-acting and exit the body quickly after treatment.

During the procedure, a designated member of our staff continuously monitors your child’s vital signs, including pulse and respiration rates, blood pressure, temperature, and blood oxygen level. After the procedure your child will remain in recovery until vital signs return to pre-sedation levels. You should then take your child home and monitor them for the remainder of the day — definitely no return to school until at least the next day.

Safety is a top priority when using any sedation therapy — dental professionals follow strict procedures and protocols, as well as adhere to certification requirements enforced by many states. Performed in this manner, conscious sedation can help ensure your child’s experiences in our office are pleasant, and will hopefully result in a greater willingness when they grow up to continue professional dental care.

If you would like more information on conscious sedation for children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sedation Dentistry for Kids.”




Burbank, CA Dentist
Edward C. Joseph, D.D.S.
2701 West Alameda Ave, Suite #503
Burbank, CA 91505
(818) 842-7628

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