Posts for: April, 2012

By Edward Joseph, D.D.S.
April 28, 2012
Category: Dental Procedures
HowtoMakeDentalFearsGoAway

Three quarters of people surveyed have admitted to having some fear about going to the dentist. About 10% to 15% are so afraid that they never go. Because they put off checkups and treatment they end up with toothaches, infections, and even lost teeth.

You should know that even those who are most afraid of the dentist can learn to reduce their fear and have dental treatment in comfort.

How does fear of the dentist get started?
Fear is learned behavior. People may learn it from stories they have heard from their parents or others, or they may learn it first hand by having a bad dental experience. Once the fear is planted, they avoid going to the dentist, so there is no way for them to learn that a visit can be a positive experience.

If you are among those who fear going to the dentist, the fearful feelings you have can be enough to reinforce themselves. Sweaty palms, rapid heartbeat, and a queasy stomach are not pleasant, and if you experience such feelings they may be your main memories after an appointment, even if the visit was not frightening in itself.

Dental fear can be a subconscious automatic response. This means that you can't control it and make it go away. But there are things you can do to reduce your fear and feel comfortable during your appointment.

Move slowly and get help to conquer your fears.
You need to have new, positive experiences to counteract the bad experiences you had in the past. Realize that you are not alone, many people share this fear. Then talk about your fears with our office. We will start by doing things that cause only mild or no anxiety. You want each visit to be a good experience, so you are able to leave our office with a feeling that this was okay, and you can do it again. It may take a while to train yourself to get over your fears, but we have helped many people accomplish this — and you can, too.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about any fears you may have. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Overcoming Dental Fear & Anxiety.”


By Edward Joseph, D.D.S.
April 20, 2012
Category: Dental Procedures
DoYouNeedASmileMakeover

We are often asked about restorative and cosmetic dentistry procedures and the role they play in a smile makeover. We are also faced with people wondering whether or not they can benefit from treatment. For this reason, we developed the following self-assessment to help you determine whether or not cosmetic dentistry is right for you.

  • Do you avoid smiling in public or for photos?
  • Are you self-conscious about spaces and gaps between your teeth?
  • Do your teeth make you look older than you feel?
  • Have you ever held back or restrained a smile?
  • Do you feel that your teeth are stained or yellow?
  • Do you hold your hand in front of your mouth when talking, laughing or smiling?
  • Do your teeth look old and worn down, making you look and feel older?
  • Do your teeth appear short because of a “gummy” smile?
  • Are your teeth crooked, chipped or crowded?
  • Do you wish you had someone else's smile?

If you answered, “yes” to one or more of the above questions, then you could benefit from a smile makeover. However, that is the easiest part of the process. The next step is the one that probably matters the most — scheduling a consultation with us. During this appointment you can discuss the specifics that bother you about your smile using your responses from our self-assessment test. You can also learn about the many treatment options available for providing you with the smile of your dreams.

Ready To Take The Next Step?

Contact us today to discuss your smile makeover questions or to schedule a consultation. Or, learn more now when you continue reading the Dear Doctor article, “The Impact Of A Smile Makeover.”


By Edward Joseph, D.D.S.
April 12, 2012
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: oral health   root canal  
RootCanalPainmdashDoYouKnowTheSymptoms

Nearly everyone has either said or heard the expression, “I'd rather have a root canal...” when comparing worst-case scenarios. However, this comparison is a common myth for a treatment that is typically successful with little to no pain. In fact, the pain associated with a root canal problem occurs prior to treatment and is relieved by it, not visa versa.

To begin with, let's define what root canal treatment is as well as the field of dentistry that specializes in it. Endodontics (“endo” – inside; “dont” – tooth) is the branch of dentistry that addresses problems affecting a tooth's root or nerve. It is dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and disorders of the root canals of the teeth. The canals inside the tooth roots contain the living tissues called the dental pulp, which also contain the nerves of the teeth. When the pulp inside a problematic tooth becomes inflamed or infected it responds by becoming painful, and pain is a warning sign of a problem. The nature of the symptoms can define the character of the pain and the problem. They include the following:

  • Sharp, acute pain that is difficult to pinpoint
  • Intense pain that occurs when biting down on the tooth or food
  • Lingering pain after eating either hot or cold foods
  • Dull ache and pressure
  • Tenderness accompanied by swelling in the nearby gums

Each of these different categories of pain signify a different problem, but all are related to root canal issues. Nevertheless, you should contact us today (before your condition worsens) to schedule an appointment. And to learn more about the signs, symptoms, and treatments for a root canal, read the article “I'd Rather Have A Root Canal....”


By Edward Joseph, D.D.S.
April 04, 2012
Category: Oral Health
FactsYouShouldKnowAboutToothWear

You may have noticed, as you get older, that the enamel of your teeth is looking worn in certain areas. Sometimes tooth wear takes the form of a minor chipping or fracturing at the incisal (cutting) edges of the teeth, or a loss of tooth material from the area near the gum line. In more severe cases, worn teeth look quite a bit smaller than they used to. Why does this happen?

Some wear with age is natural. But too much wear can interfere with your bite, expose more sensitive inner parts of the tooth to decay, and give you a more aged appearance.

There are things you can control that affect wear:

Your habits: Clenching or grinding habits, also called “bruxism,” is a major cause of tooth wear. The motion of teeth sliding over each other with forces that are beyond what's normal for biting or chewing causes a mechanical removal of tooth enamel. This can happen during sleep or periods of high stress. In either case there are therapies available, such as a thin, professionally made mouthguard that prevents your teeth from coming into contact with each other. Holding foreign objects, such as nails and bobby pins, between your teeth can also cause wear.

Your diet: Tooth enamel can be eroded (dissolved away) by acidic beverages, such as sodas, sports drinks and juices. Frequent snacking on sugary foods encourages the growth of oral bacteria that produce acid as a byproduct — also leaving your teeth vulnerable to tooth decay. Your saliva can buffer the effects of the acid in your mouth in about half an hour; if you consume these types of foods and beverages continually, there won't be enough time for this to work.

We can restore the appearance and function of worn teeth in a variety of ways. Porcelain crowns and veneers, for example, can re-establish the normal thickness and length of teeth while improving their color and giving you a more youthful appearance.

If you have any questions about tooth wear, please contact us today to schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more about tooth wear by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How And Why Teeth Wear.”




Burbank, CA Dentist
Edward C. Joseph, D.D.S.
2701 West Alameda Ave, Suite #503
Burbank, CA 91505
(818) 842-7628

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